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Watch Full Movie Online And Download Be Afraid(2017)

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Quality: HD
Title : Be Afraid
Release : 2017-04-01.
Language : English.
Runtime : 99 min.
Genre : Thriller, Science Fiction.
Stars : Brian Krause, Kevin Grevioux, Louis Herthum, Jaimi Paige, Callie Thorne, Jared Abrahamson.

Not long after John Chambers and his family arrive at their new home in a small country town of Pennsylvania, John begins to experience sleep paralysis. Lying there paralyzed, trapped within his own nightmare, other-worldly beings visit John. They are entities which exist in the darkest shadows of the night and can only be seen out of the corner of one’s eye. These encounters begin to haunt John, transforming to complete terror as he discovers the entities’ sole purpose… the abduction of his seven year old son. In the end, John will uncover the town’s horrific secret, a portal on his land, and make one last attempt to save his son before the shadow people permanently take him away to their world.

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Elevations above sea level for Berkeley Pit water and surrouding Butte, Montana landmarks. Map image from Google Earth, graphic by Justin Ringsak.

Could the Berkeley Pit ever overflow?

The Berkeley Pit will never overflow. In 1994 the EPA established the Critical Water Level (the maximum level the water will be allowed to reach) at 5,410 feet above sea level, which is one hundred feet below the rim.

Elevations above sea level for Berkeley Pit water and surrouding Butte, Montana landmarks. Map image from Google Earth, graphic by Justin Ringsak.
Elevations above sea level for Berkeley Pit water and surrounding Butte, Montana landmarks. Image from Google Earth. Click on the image to view a larger version.

Water levels are regularly monitored at the Pit, in historic underground mines, and in wells surrounding the Pit. Failure to keep the water below 5,410 feet would result in steep fines for the companies responsible for the site, BP-ARCO and Montana Resources.

In addition to careful monitoring, the Horseshoe Bend Water Treatment Plant was constructed to make sure water in the Pit remains below 5,410 feet. Pit water will be pumped, treated, and discharged when the level nears the critical point.

Even if the water was allowed to rise unchecked, it would still never reach the rim. The groundwater flow would reverse direction and, instead of flowing toward the Pit, as it does now, the water would flow away from the Pit, underground into the sandy aquifer beneath Butte’s valley.

Due to the underground flow, Pit surface water would never reach the rim. Considering the federal orders, potential fines, and frequent monitoring, Pit water will not rise unchecked.

How is the Horseshoe Bend Water Treatment Plant operating?

The plant treats about 3.4 million gallons of water per day. This water currently comes from the Horseshoe Bend drainage. Treated water is used in Montana Resources mining operations.

Sludge from the treatment process is returned to the Pit at a rate of 250,000 gallons per day. No water or waste leaves the Berkeley Pit or mine site.

Five-Year Review Report (2011) for the Berkeley Pit

Throughout 2010, the EPA interviewed local citizens and reviewed the status of Butte area Superfund sites, including the Berkeley, as part of a five-year review. The final review report, released in 2011, is available to the public and can be downloaded at the EPA Butte/Silver Bow Creek website. The sections of the report relating to the Butte Mine Flooding Operable Unit, which includes the Berkeley Pit, can be downloaded below.live streaming film Fifty Shades Darker 2017

EPA Third Five Year Review Report (2011) – Vol. 3 – Butte Mine Flooding Operable Unit (BMFOU) (644.3 KiB)

EPA Third Five Year Review Report (2011) – Vol. 3 – Butte Mine Flooding Operable Unit (BMFOU) – Appendix A: Site Photos (1.5 MiB)

EPA Third Five Year Review Report (2011) – Vol. 3 – Butte Mine Flooding Operable Unit (BMFOU) – Appendix B: Responsiveness Summary (96.3 KiB)

EPA Third Five Year Review Report (2011) – Vol. 3 – Butte Mine Flooding Operable Unit (BMFOU) – Figures (2.1 MiB)

If you would like to learn more about the review, call Nikia Greene, EPA Community Involvement Coordinator, at 1-866-457-2690, or visit the Butte EPA office at 155 West Granite (in the Courthouse).

Butte, Montana, mine flooding west camp wells, shafts and area of 1960s flooding. The west camp groundwater system is monitored and maintained separately from the Berkeley Pit and connected east camp mines.

West Camp also part of mine flooding site

A timeline of the history of the West Camp portion of the greater Butte, Montana Superfund site, which is monitored and managed separately from the Berkeley Pit and connected East Camp mines.
A timeline of the history of the West Camp portion of the greater Butte, Montana Superfund site, which is monitored and managed separately from the Berkeley Pit and connected East Camp mines. Click on the image to view a larger version.

The anatomy of the thousands of miles of tunnels beneath the Butte Hill is daunting to consider and little understood by many. Important details, such as the distinction between the “West Camp” and “East Camp”, can cause consternation for many a curious observer.

The Berkeley Pit and surrounding underground mine workings and bedrock wells are referred to as the “East Camp”, and are separate from the “West Camp”, which is located more to the south and west. The Camps essentially refer to two water systems. In the East Camp, surface and underground water flows to the lowest point in the system, namely, the Berkeley Pit. The West Camp, whose waters never reach the Berkeley, is another story.

The West Camp lies southwest of the Berkeley Pit/East Camp drainage and includes the Travona, Emma, and Ophir mine workings. Just as in the East Camp, the groundwater in this area has been closely monitored since the suspension of pumping in 1982 to ensure that water levels do not rise high enough to significantly impact surrounding aquifers—in this case, 5,435 feet is the magic number.

Since November 1989, pumping operations have kept West Camp water below this level. In the late 1950s, the West Camp mine workings were sealed off from the rest of the shafts and drifts on the Butte Hill by a series of barriers, or bulkheads—some made of wood, some cement.

Three main cement bulkheads block the connections between the Emma in the West Camp and the Original mine in the East Camp at the 1,600-foot level, and between the Emma and Colorado mines at the 1,400- and 1,000-foot levels.

Anaconda Company crews originally installed the bulkheads for two main reasons: 1) there were no plans to continue mining in the West Camp, and 2) they wanted to increase the efficiency of continuing mining operations in the other underground mines of the East Camp and the Berkeley Pit.

The bulkheads allowed the company to eventually reduce the volume of both groundwater pumped out from underground shafts and the area underground that required fresh air to be pumped in. However, even after the bulkheads were installed, water was pumped out of the West Camp Emma shaft until 1965.

The Horseshoe Bend Water Treatment Plant, completed in 2003, captures surface water to slow the rate of fill of the Berkeley Pit lake. In the future, the plant will capture and treat water to prevent Pit water from rising further. Photo by Justin Ringsak.

Water treatment plant working as expected

The Horseshoe Bend Water Treatment Plant, completed in 2003, captures surface water to slow the rate of fill of the Berkeley Pit lake. In the future, the plant will capture and treat water to prevent Pit water from rising further. Photo by Justin Ringsak.
The Horseshoe Bend Water Treatment Plant, completed in 2003, captures surface water to slow the rate of fill of the Berkeley Pit lake. In the future, the plant will capture and treat water to prevent Pit water from rising further.

Looking northeast from the Berkeley Pit viewing stand, visitors can see one of the most important components in the future management of the Pit: the Horseshoe Bend Water Treatment Plant. Sitting on four acres near the former McQueen neighborhood, about 600 feet east of the Berkeley Pit, the treatment plant was constructed in 2002-2003. It sits on native land that is very stable, and the plant was built to withstand the maximum probable earthquake.

The facility was designed to treat up to seven million gallons per day, or about 5,000 gallons of water per minute. The facility cost approximately $18 million to build, and, depending on how much water is treated, operating expenses run about $2 million per year.

Once the Berkeley Pit water comes online, which is projected to happen in 2023, annual operation and maintenance costs could be as high as $4.5 million. Under the terms of the 2002 Consent Decree negotiated with the government, BP-ARCO and Montana Resources have agreed to provide financial assurances to pay operation and maintenance expenses in perpetuity. The two companies also paid all construction costs for the facility.

The actual construction of the treatment plant was a massive undertaking. It is estimated that workers put in 125,000 hours of total labor, and the facility also required more than 4,500 cubic yards of concrete.

The general construction contractor and subcontractors were all from Montana, with several from Butte, and, during the course of construction, they reported no safety incidents of any kind.

As per the schedule listed in the 1994 EPA Record of Decision and included in the 2002 Consent Decree, based upon current water level projections, a review of the Horseshoe Bend Water Treatment Plant design and operation would begin in 2019. Any necessary upgrades would have to be completed by 2021, two years before Pit water itself is currently projected to be pumped and treated in 2023.

In November, 2007, a performance review of the Horseshoe Bend plant was completed by Montana Resources, ARCO, and North American Water Systems, with cooperation from the Montana Bureau of Mines & Geology, the Department of Environmental Quality, and the EPA.

The performance test was undertaken to ensure that the treatment system is capable of meeting the water quality standards set in the Consent Decree for the site. For this test, only water from the Horseshoe Bend drainage was treated, as water from the Pit is not yet required to be pumped and treated at the plant.

The test began on November 18, 2007, and continued for 72 hours. All of the water quality standards for contaminants of concern were met. Additional adjustments still need to be made to address pH. For this test, the pH was kept at a high (basic or alkaline) level in order to effectively remove contaminants of concern and meet water quality standards.

The optimization of the plant in the future may result in a lower pH. Additionally, methods of adjusting the pH prior to discharge to Silver Bow Creek have been evaluated conceptually. Any method of adjusting the pH will be formally evaluated, if necessary, before any water from the plant is discharged to Silver Bow Creek.

This aerial photo taken in 2001 shows the location of the Continental fault east of Butte, Montana. It has been monitored closely for 25 years and has not shown enough activity to prompt earthquake concerns.

What if an earthquake were to strike?

This aerial photo taken in 2001 shows the location of the Continental fault east of Butte, Montana. It has been monitored closely for 25 years and has not shown enough activity to prompt earthquake concerns.
This aerial photo taken in 2001 shows the location of the Continental fault east of Butte, Montana. It has been monitored closely for 25 years and has not shown enough activity to prompt earthquake concerns.

There are several reasons why we don’t need to be overly concerned about the Pit in the event of an earthquake, including the fact that there has been no significant seismic activity in nearby faults during the 28 years that the Earthquake Studies Office has been monitoring the area.

In the mining region, the recorded seismic activity is mainly caused by a few mining blasts per week, however, two landslides in the pit have been recorded in the last 28 years and a few very small, non-mining related earthquakes are recorded within Butte Silver-Bow county annually. Most seismic activity in Montana occurs outside of Silver-Bow County, and in the worst-case scenario, a large earthquake could cause landslides or sloughing in the Pit, but would not cause the Pit to overflow. Such an earthquake would cause considerably more damage to buildings and structures in the Uptown area than to the landscape or Pit.

After the initial PitWatch article on earthquakes in the Spring of 2005, there was a 5.6 magnitude earthquake centered near Dillon on July 25, 2005. This earthquake was felt in Butte, but there was no evidence of any sloughing or rise in water level in the Pit.

According to the Earthquake Studies Office, there have been approximately 20 very small earthquakes within 25 km of Butte in the past year, ranging in magnitude from -.2 to 1.9. Nineteen of these were less than magnitude 1.0, and only 4 were located within Silver-Bow County. Three of these events were non-mining related events in Butte and were not large enough to be felt.

There have been no reports, past or present, of any earthquake damage to the Pit and the last earthquake greater than magnitude 1.0 in the area was a 2.8 on October 9, 2005, located 3.3 kilometers west-southwest of Butte along Silver Bow Creek.

This topic was covered in the 2005 Spring and Fall issues of PitWatch.

This observation stand overlooking the Berkeley Pit is used by Montana Resources (MR) as part of their bird mitigation program.

Seasonal bird mitigation efforts ongoing

This observation stand overlooking the Berkeley Pit is used by Montana Resources (MR) as part of their bird mitigation program.
This observation stand overlooking the Berkeley Pit is used by Montana Resources (MR) as part of their bird mitigation program.

After several highly publicized incidences of bird deaths at the Berkeley Pit, a popular myth arose: migratory waterfowl are instantly killed if they land on water in the Berkeley Pit. In fact, hundreds of waterfowl land on the surface of the Berkeley Pit every month during migration seasons, and they typically fly off unharmed within a few hours, either on their own or through Montana Resource’s hazing activities, also known as the waterfowl mitigation program.

The 2002 Consent Decree recognizes that “birds exposed to Berkeley Pit water for less than 4-6 hours should not be at substantial risk.” If a bird is observed suffering from the effects of water toxicity, it is netted and brought on board the houseboat used to patrol the Pit lake. The bird is placed in a 5-gallon bucket of fresh water and brought to shore. It is then transported to a veterinarian or released into fresh water at the north end of the Yankee Doodle Tailings Pond; tailings particles settle out on the south portion of the pond, leaving clear, alkaline (or non-acidic) water in the north end which mixes with snowmelt runoff from upper drainages, resulting in very low concentrations of dissolved metals.

In November 1995, a flock of snow geese landed on the Pit lake. After several days of stormy weather and fog, 342 birds were found dead. In response to this incident, the two responsible parties for the Pit under federal Superfund law, Montana Resources and British Petroleum-Atlantic Richfield, also known as BP-ARCO, implemented a waterfowl mitigation plan, which was approved by the EPA and other agencies in May 1998. This program is aimed at locating waterfowl in the area and then inciting the birds to fly away. An observation station was set up overlooking the Pit area. This station is an enclosed building equipped with spotting scopes and spotlights for night viewing to locate, count and identify species of waterfowl on the Pit lake.

Montana Resources’ personnel make hourly observations for birds during the spring and fall migrations, while the pit is not frozen, and cut back to 5-6 observations per day during non-migratory seasons. A variety of devices are used to chase birds off the water and out of the Pit. From the observation station near the southeast rim of the Berkeley Pit, Montana Resources’ personnel use rifles and shotguns to scare birds into the air.

In addition, three Phoenix Wailers – high-tech devices that emit predator and electronic sounds – are located near the surface of the Pit lake to discourage birds from landing. A 22-foot houseboat, docked near the pump barge, is used for periodic excursions on the water to haze waterfowl that ignore other warnings. Not all types of birds react to hazing. Typically, most ducks, geese and swans will react immediately to the noises. Diver birds such as grebes and loons tend to go underwater as a natural defense mechanism when they are alarmed.

Normally, if birds are not hazed or disturbed, they leave the Pit area at nightfall. If a dead bird is found on the water or near the Pit, then the US Fish and Wildlife Service is contacted. They decide if an autopsy is necessary.

From 1995 through 2004, 75 birds were found dead. The advances made to deter migrating waterfowl from landing on the water or staying on the Pit appear to be working. Thousands of birds land and are hazed off of the Pit each year.

Though many local authorities decided that the 1995 incident was isolated and not likely to happen again with the safeguards that are in place, in October 2007, 37 birds, including ducks, geese, and one swan, were found dead at the Pit after a weekend of fog. It is unclear why mitigation activities failed to haze these birds away from the site, although the weather was almost certainly a factor. As the mitigation program continues, all involved continue to work to keep such incidents to a minimum.

The chart below, from the 2011 EPA Five Year Review Report on the site, shows Pit-related bird deaths from 2006-2009.

This chart, from the 2011 EPA Five Year Review Report on the site, shows Berkeley Pit-related bird deaths from 2006-2009.
This chart, from the 2011 EPA Five Year Review Report on the site, shows Berkeley Pit-related bird deaths from 2006-2009. Click on the image to view a larger version.

43 billion gallons and counting: Where does it come from?

Water in the Berkeley Pit rising over time, 1979-2013. Photos from the Montana Bureau of Mines & Geology, Justin Ringsak, and Fritz Daily.

When ARCO suspended underground pumping operations in 1982, groundwater levels on the Butte Hill began to rise. Nineteen months later the water level in the underground workings and surrounding bedrock reached the bottom of the Pit, allowing bedrock groundwater to start filling the Pit void.

The Berkeley Pit in 1982. The water seen here is surface runoff flowing into the Leonard mine shaft to the right at the Pit bottom.
The Berkeley Pit in 1982. The water seen here is surface runoff flowing into the Leonard mine shaft to the right at the Pit bottom.

Prior to that time alluvial groundwater seeped into the Pit from the east and south walls, beginning to fill the Pit lake. ARCO also diverted water from its mining operations (leach pad water, Continental Pit, Horseshoe Bend, etc.) into the Pit following the 1983 shutdown of their entire Butte operations.

When Montana Resources began operations in 1986 a number of these surface water sources were diverted away from the Pit, however, the Horseshoe Bend water continued to flow into the Pit until April 1996 when it was incorporated in Montana Resource’s mining operations for treatment and disposal in the Yankee Doodle Tailings Dam.

When Montana Resources suspended mining operations from 2000 through 2003, about 7.5 billion gallons of water, or an average of 6 million gallons per day, went into the Pit. Of this total, an average of 3.4 million gallons per day came from rising groundwater flows in the underground mine workings and surface stormwater flow. An average of 2.6 million gallons per day came from the Horseshoe Bend drainage. Montana Resources also diverted water from the Continental Pit into the Berkeley Pit for containment during their suspension.

Since the Horseshoe Bend Water Treatment Plant began operating in 2003, water flows from the Horseshoe Bend drainage have been diverted to the treatment plant. After treatment, this Horseshoe Bend water is entirely recycled or consumed in mining operations, or, in other words, no water is discharged off of the site.

About 2.6 million gallons per day from groundwater and stormwater still flow into the Pit, contributing to the rising level there. Eventually, when the water level approaches the Critical Level of 5,410 feet above sea level, water will be pumped from the Berkeley Pit and treated at the Horseshoe Bend facility. Present projections put this date around 2023. Having the plant in place provides assurance that the capability to manage Berkeley Pit water levels is there when it becomes necessary to treat Pit water.

This 2006 image from the NASA Earth Observatory shows the Berkeley Pit and surrounding area after the construction of the Horseshoe Bend Water Treatment Plant and after the resumption of mining at the Continental Pit.
This 2006 image from the NASA Earth Observatory shows the Berkeley Pit and surrounding area after the construction of the Horseshoe Bend Water Treatment Plant and after the resumption of mining at the Continental Pit.